Need help? Call +4420 3488 2209 | FREE UK shipping on orders over £50! | Register for Annual Tea & Chat 2021

Shopping Cart

Your cart is empty

Continue Shopping

New study: vast majority of black hair products linked to disease

Last week a news article brought attention to a huge problem facing women: our beauty products can be hazardous to our health. A huge number of cosmetic products still contain parabens which have been linked in scientific studies to cancer, reduced muscle mass, weight gain and hormone disruption. Whilst all women face risks from cosmetics, this research showed women caring for their afro hair are at increased risk of serious harm. The study published in the Environmental Research journal showed over 78% of hair products marketed towards black women containing chemicals linked to obesity, infertility and cancer.  Products to avoid included not only relaxers, which are widely known to cause harm since Chris Rock’s documentary, “Good Hair,” but also seemingly healthy products such as hot-oil treatments, hair lotions, anti-frizz polishes, leave-in conditioners and root stimulators. The study showed that around 80% of relaxers contain toxic chemicals such as parabens as well as phthalates which are commonly used as preservatives despite being linked to early menopause, breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Further, 100% of mainstream black hair care products contain artificial fragrances which can cause asthma, eczema, muscle pain, bloating, sinus pain, fatigue, eye irritation, gastrointestinal problems, headaches, dizziness and burning or itching skin irritations. We've written about this before as making our community safe is one of our core missions, it's why we started Afrocenchix. We believe all women should be able to access safe and effective haircare at their convenience, that's why all of our products are 97-100% natural and we never use parabens, sulphates, phthalates, harsh preservatives or artificial fragrances. The scientists behind the paper encourage haircare brands to make safer cosmetics, in the meantime they recommend that you reduce your chemical exposure by choosing natural products. Looking for products that are paraben and fragrance free, and preferably plant-based or organic is one of their top tips. Our vegan certified range of products for afro & curly hair are formulated with health in mind and we encourage holistic wellbeing, that's the reason you'll find our products in Whole Foods, Greenbay, G Baldwins, The Grocery and the best independent health stores. What do you think? Are you shocked or unsurprised that black women are still 'over-exposed and under-protected from toxic chemicals'? Let us know if you have any ideas for other ways we can fix the broken black hair care industry. Full study: Jessica S. Helm et al, Measurement of endocrine disrupting and asthma-associated chemicals in hair products used by Black women, Environmental Research (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.03.030  More articles: Risky Chemicals in Black Beauty Products Afrocenchix in Whole Foods!  5 Things You Need to Know About Natural Hair Healthy Hair? It's All About Balance

New study: vast majority of black hair products linked to disease

Last week a news article brought attention to a huge problem facing women: our beauty products can be hazardous to our health. A huge number of cosmetic products still contain parabens which have been linked in scientific studies to cancer, reduced muscle mass, weight gain and hormone disruption. Whilst all women...

Celebrating 10 Inspiring British Women this International Women's Day

We love International Women's Day. Seeing our feeds full of intelligent, beautiful, talented women building each other up is always a joy. This year we are celebrating some inspiring black women from our home shores. 1. Vinna - Curly Treats Fest View this post on Instagram A post shared by...

3 Ways to Valentine Differently

Valentine's Day is upon us. Whilst we don't think expressing appreciation for your loved ones should be restricted to one day, it's a great reminder of the importance to make time for love. It's also a good time to indulge in a little self-care too, no one can pour from an empty cup. Whether you’re...

Jacqueline's Hair Story - Why She Went Natural

In this series we are sharing hair stories from women like you. This time it's all about Sky TV presenter Jacqueline Shepherd.

Why is my hair so dry? 4 permanent fixes to say bye to dry hair!

Contribution from Ebun, a pharmacist from London. I went natural 3 years ago, the longer my afro hair grew the drier it got. Here are my solutions.

The History of the Afro Comb

This post is based on a fuller article by culture blogger Kirsty of MisBeee Writes on the Origins of the Afro Combs - 6000 years of Culture, Politics and Identity exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum. Use of the Afro Comb dates back 6,000 years. Combs may have started out as functional tools...

Black Feminine Beauty in Art

 One of the things we love about social media is its ability to expose us to things we might otherwise have been unlikely to come across because of geography. Instagram has definitely made the world smaller and diminished the vastness of the oceans. Below we have highlighted three artists we...

How Not to Leave the Salon in Tears

In this post, Afrocenchix co-founder Rachael recounts her nightmare salon experience and how much harm was caused. She also gives tips for what to do when in the salon so that your voice is heard and you avoid the awful experience and make sure your salon trips are positive. 

Maria's Hair Story - Why She Went Natural

In this series we are sharing hair stories from women like you. This time round we have a story from Maria, who blogs as Ms Xpat on the Tiger Tales. "I had my first full head of relaxer when I was about 14 years old. I say ‘full head’ because...

Do we subconsciously think Afro Hair is unprofessional?

Guest post from Miss Chuma. Inspired by the March 2017 Haircare 101 event. My initial intention for attending the Hair 101 event was to explore new ways of wearing my hair. What I left with was far greater.

Hairspiration: Felicia Leatherwood

(Feature image taken from www.felicialeatherwood.com) We spoke about natural hair being professional at our last #HairCare 101 event and watched a video clip in which Felicia Leatherwood, a natural hair stylist sometimes referred to as the Hair Whisperer, spoke about the importance of embracing our hair in its natural state. We...

Risky Chemicals in Black Beauty Products

Does looking good need to be a hazard? We don’t believe it does. Unfortunately for many black women, beauty choices are damaging their health. A recent buzzfeed article highlighted the problem faced by millions of women – most cosmetics are toxic. Thankfully there are natural options for the health conscious. The problem...

Toxicity in Your Everyday Afro Hair Products

This week a new report* showed that everyday hair products targeting Black women may be causing serious health problems. The report, based on years of research, highlights several areas of concern including: skin and eye irritations, respiratory disorders, cancer and reproductive Issues.  The report calls for more research into the health consequences of Black hair...

Rachael’s Healthy Hair Routine

Hello, Rachael here! I’m a low maintenance kind of girl so I don’t spend much time on my hair, but I still like it to look and feel good. I find that protective styling and a simple routine help me to keep my hair looking and feeling its best in the minimum time....

5 Reasons your Hair is Breaking

A common complaint we hear from women is that their hair doesn't grow. In most cases, it is growing, it's just breaking as fast as it grows. If your hair is short it should be because you choose to cut it, not because it keeps falling off! Control your hair...

Joycelyn's Healthy Hair Routine

Hello, Joycelyn here! When it comes to my natural hair I like to keep things as simple and easy as possible. This means low manipulation and protective styling. I have a simple routine to help me take care of my natural hair. WeeklyI wash my hair every 7-10 days with Swish. Before...